MORE THAN THE BAKLAVA

When I moved to Baltimore, I was surprised to find all of the local pizza parlors were owned by Greeks. Not Italians?

Well, it took time before I discovered the alternatives, beginning in the city’s Little Italy.

But that occurred about the same time I was told most diners were owned by Greeks, too. And I’ve come to love diners, even though I’d been introduced to the real thing way back right after college. They just weren’t fashionable then.

Well, somewhere in-between there had been the Dairy Queen owned by a Greek-American who, though a big error by the Bank of France, wound up instantly nearly seven-figures rich – and took flight to his homeland before the error was discovered. It was a big news story where I was for the next month, before he repented and returned.

So more recently, I ordered a pizza from a local parlor. Wanted to support a young friend who works there. When I picked up the box, there was no gaudy image of a fat smiling chef on the top of the steaming box – a good sign, in my book. And then I noticed the design was mostly white with blue trim, adhering to the national Greek colors. Along with a border of … the signature Greek key pattern. OK, I thought. I get it. Even before I noticed the words gyros and pizza in a little house, side by side.

That does it. I’m definitely going back for a gyro.

And, for the record, the box is distributed from our favorite Italian grocery in Portland, Maine. Has me wondering about the rest of the story.

5 thoughts on “MORE THAN THE BAKLAVA

  1. Ha! Get your gyro from Luigi, not Yanni? It reminds me that around here, most Japanese restaurants are run by Koreans. I wonder how much of this kind of thing applies elsewhere.

  2. There used to be a Greek restaurant in Duluth, MN not far from where I once lived and was open all night. Dolomades, calamari, spanakopita, and garlicky mashed potatoes. They also made great pancakes stuffed with walnuts. Just so good.

      1. Awesome sauce. Really, the sauce is quite good – just the right combination of herbs.

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