My wife has long insisted I have a face made for the 19th century

Among the artists-in-residence the Tides Institute invited to town last year was tintype photographer John DiMartino from Brooklyn.

He was certainly the most visible, with his big camera and tripod everywhere and his workaholic hours. He was enthralled with the place, its light, and its people.

John DiMartino at work in downtown Eastport last summer.

Curiously, his medium gave everything he shot a back-in-history quality, as well as reversing the subject before him.

Here’s what he did to me.

There’s no retouching of a tintype and no cropping, either. It’s all in the camera.
As a model, you have to hold the pose. And don’t blink for six or so seconds.

For more of his portfolios and other characters he captured in town, check out his website, johndimartinojr.com.

Roughly every six hours

At high tide, Eastport’s breakwater pier resembles harbors just about anywhere. The far side of the pier is, though, a deep water port capable of docking a giant cruise ship.

 

It is a working port, after all.

 

In just six hours, though, the change in the water level is breathtaking. Yes, this is the dock on the upper left in the top photo. The tide varies up to 24 feet twice a day. It’s part of Fundy Bay.

 

The dark band illustrates how far the tide has dropped. The U.S. Coast Guard station above it gives you a height comparison.

 

At John Locke’s mill site on the Isinglass River

The stream looks tranquil now, but when swollen by spring rains and melting snowpack, the rush shoots out horizontally from the ledge above. Maybe someday I’ll get of photo of that for comparison.
Another trickle meanders from the other side of the falls when the river runs low in late summer and early autumn.
The mill sat here. The last of it was washed away by flooding in 1898.
Stonework just upstream is all that remains of a bridge that also washed away in 1898, a reminder of how dramatically the river can rise and gather force.
On a pleasant fall day, the pool allows for curious exploration.